7331 E Osborn Dr, Ste 250                  
               Scottsdale, AZ 85251                                
                    480-947-7725                                     

Welcome to our Patient Education page!

We believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics, which can be found on the side of each page. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. You may also search this database, entering your term(s) in the search bar provided.

For more comprehensive information on skin conditions please follow these links to the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology and American Academy of Dermatology websites both of which maintain excellent databases for patients.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

 

ASDS Non-Physician Practice of Medicine & Patient Safety Campaign 

"Due to the proliferation of spas, salons and walk-in clinics offering cosmetic procedures performed by non-physicians, the ASDS has noted a significant increase in patient complications."

The problem of impaired safety arises from a lax regulatory environment, indiscriminate sales of medical equipment and the absence of adequate dermatologic training among non-physician providers.  Arizona, in particular, lags behind other states in regulation and the enforcement of laws involving the non-physician practice of medicine.  Frequent complications seen by dermatologists include laser burns, scarring, pigmentary changes, inappropriate treatment, the delayed diagnosis of disease and mis-managment of adverse events.  

Patients should be aware of the potential hazards associated with treatments received in medical spas, salons and clinics owned or staffed by non-physicians and, whenever possible, seek the advice and care of board-certified physicians with training in cutaneous medicine and surgery. 

Complications from the Non-Physician Practice of Medicine

ASDS Patient Safety Campaign

 

Also known as solar keratosis, actinic keratosis affects more than 10 million Americans. These precancerous growths on the skin are caused by overexposure to the sun over a long period of time. They are characterized by rough dry lesions or patches that appear on sun-exposed areas of the skin, such as the face, back of hands, arms, scalp or shoulders. The lesions may be red, pink, gray or skin colored. Lesions often begin as flat, scaly areas and develop into a rough-textured surface. Sometimes it is easier to feel a growth than it is to see it.

Actinic keratosis is more common among fair-skinned people and those who have had years of outdoor or tanning bed exposure to ultraviolet light. Actinic keratosis can develop into malignant cells, typically squamous cell carcinoma, which is a type of skin cancer. That's why treatment isimportant. After a physical examination and biopsy of the lesion, your dermatologist will opt for one of the following treatments to remove the growth:

  • Cryosurgery, which freezes off the growth using liquid nitrogen.
  • Surgical removal in which the doctor scrapes off the lesion and bleeding is stopped by electrocautery.
  • Chemical peels that cause the top layer of skin to peel off.
  • Photodynamic therapy in which a dye is applied that sensitizes the skin to light and the area is then exposed to light via a laser or other light source.
  • Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS) that cause a slow inflammation and peeling; used in more superficial cases.
  • Topical Chemotherapeutic agents (5 Fluorouracil, Aldara) can also be used.