7331 E Osborn Dr, Ste 250                  
               Scottsdale, AZ 85251                                
                    480-947-7725                                     

Welcome to our Patient Education page!

We believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics, which can be found on the side of each page. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. You may also search this database, entering your term(s) in the search bar provided.

For more comprehensive information on skin conditions please follow these links to the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology and American Academy of Dermatology websites both of which maintain excellent databases for patients.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

 

ASDS Non-Physician Practice of Medicine & Patient Safety Campaign 

"Due to the proliferation of spas, salons and walk-in clinics offering cosmetic procedures performed by non-physicians, the ASDS has noted a significant increase in patient complications."

The problem of impaired safety arises from a lax regulatory environment, indiscriminate sales of medical equipment and the absence of adequate dermatologic training among non-physician providers.  Arizona, in particular, lags behind other states in regulation and the enforcement of laws involving the non-physician practice of medicine.  Frequent complications seen by dermatologists include laser burns, scarring, pigmentary changes, inappropriate treatment, the delayed diagnosis of disease and mis-managment of adverse events.  

Patients should be aware of the potential hazards associated with treatments received in medical spas, salons and clinics owned or staffed by non-physicians and, whenever possible, seek the advice and care of board-certified physicians with training in cutaneous medicine and surgery. 

Complications from the Non-Physician Practice of Medicine

ASDS Patient Safety Campaign

 

Rosacea is a chronic skin condition that causes facial redness, acne-like pimples, visible small blood vessels on the face, swelling and/or watery, irritated eyes. This inflammation of the face can affect the cheeks, nose, chin, forehead or eyelids. More than 14 million Americans suffer from rosacea. It is not contagious, but there is some evidence to suggest that it is inherited. There is no known cause or cure for rosacea. There is also no link between rosacea and cancer.

Rosacea generally begins after age 30 and goes through cycles of flare-ups and remissions. Over time, it gets ruddier in color and small blood vessels (like spider veins) may appear on the face. If left untreated, bumps and pimples may form, the end of the nose may become swollen, red and bulbous and eyes may water or become irritated.

Rosacea occurs most often among people with fair skin who tend to blush or flush easily. It occurs more often among women than men, but men tend to suffer from more severe symptoms. Most patients experience multiple symptoms at varying levels of severity. Common symptoms include:

  • flushing
  • persistently red skin on the face
  • bumps or acne-like pimples
  • visible blood vessels on facial skin
  • watery or irritated eyes
  • burning, itching or stinging of facial skin
  • skin roughness and dryness
  • raised red patches
  • swelling (edema)

These symptoms may also appear on the neck, chest, scalp and ears.

Research conducted by the National Rosacea Foundation found that the leading triggers for rosacea are:

  • sun exposure
  • hot or cold weather
  • emotional stress
  • wind
  • alcohol
  • heavy exercise
  • spicy foods
  • hot baths
  • heated beverages
  • some skin care products
  • humidity
  • indoor heat

While there is no cure for rosacea and each case is unique, your doctor will probably prescribe oral antibiotics and topical medications to reduce the severity of the symptoms. When the condition goes into remission, only topical treatments may be needed. In more severe cases, a vascular laser, intense pulsed light source or other medical device may be used to remove any visible blood vessels and reduce excess redness and bumpiness on the nose.

To help reduce the incidence of flare-ups, a gentle daily skin care routine is recommended that includes the use of mild, non-abrasive cleansers, soft cloths, rinsing in lukewarm water (not hot or cold), and blotting the face dry (not rubbing). Additionally, individuals with rosacea need to protect themselves from sun exposure by using sunscreens with SPF 15 or higher and sunblocks that eliminate UVA and UVB rays. Patients are also encouraged to keep a record of flare-ups to try and determine the lifestyle and environmental triggers that aggravate the condition.